Jan DriessenChange photo
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  • Archaeology Dept
    Université Catholique de Louvain
    Place B Pascal 1
    1348 Louvain-la-Neuve
  • +3210474890
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When Sir Arthur Evans was establishing the chronology of the Minoan period at Knossos in the early twentieth century, Robert Carr Bosanquet and his team from the British School at Athens began to define the contemporary sequence at... more
When Sir Arthur Evans was establishing the chronology of the Minoan period at Knossos in the early twentieth century, Robert Carr Bosanquet and his team from the British School at Athens began to define the contemporary sequence at Palaikastro in eastern Crete. One of the aims of the recent British School excavations at Palaikastro is to refine the early excavator's results and to explore social, political and environmental change within the Cretan Bronze Age. The discovery of two wells with undisturbed layers of the LM IB to LM IIIA2 periods (the fifteenth and fourteenth centuries BC) provided a rare opportunity to study the pottery chronology and development in detail, but also to look at diet, foreign connections, and religious practices at that time. One surprise was the discovery of the remains of several dogs related to the modern Cretan Tracer Hound. Another was part of an exquisite stone vase with dolphins carved in relief. This volume gives the first detailed template of LM IB to LM IIIA2 pottery at Palaikastro along with final reports on the wells' excavation and complete contents by members of the international team of specialists who excavate at Palaikastro. Volume contents: 1. Introduction (L. H. Sackett, J. A. MacGillivray and J. M. Driessen); 2. Well 576: excavation and stratigraphy (S. M. Thorne); 3. Well 576: the pottery deposits and ceramic sequence (E. M. Hatzaki); 4. Well 605: Stratigraphy and Catalogue (J. A. MacGillivray); 5. The Late Minoan pottery (J. A. MacGillivray); 6. The ceramic petrography of LM III A2 conical cup fabrics (C. Doherty); The stone and terracotta finds (D. Evely); 8. The stamped seal impression on pot 251 (J. Weingarten); 9. The stone 'horns of consecration' or 'twin peaks' (J. A. MacGillivray); 10. The animal bones (S. Wall-Crowther); 11. Archaeobotanical observations (A. Sarpaki); 12. The fish remains (D. Mylonas); 13. Shells and snails (D. Reese); 14. Synthesis (L. H. Sackett and J. A. MacGillivray).
The Palaikastro `Kouros', as it is called, was recovered between 1987 and 1990, in fragments, from burnt destruction layers of Late Minoan (LM) IB date (c. 1475 BC) at Palaikastro, in east Crete. It is a unique creation: a composite... more
The Palaikastro `Kouros', as it is called, was recovered between 1987 and 1990, in fragments, from burnt destruction layers of Late Minoan (LM) IB date (c. 1475 BC) at Palaikastro, in east Crete. It is a unique creation: a composite statuette, about 0.5 m tall, made on Crete, perhaps locally, but in part from imported materials, and under the cultural influence of New Kingdom Egypt. The main body of the statuette -- which betrays a surprising attention to anatomical detail -- was constructed from eight pieces of hippopotamus ivory held together by small wooden dowels. The head was carved from serpentine, with inlaid, rock crystal eyes, and there is additional ornament of gold and Egyptian blue. The Palaikastro kouros tells the story of its discovery, excavation, conservation, original construction and subsequent restoration. But who was the Kouros? It was probably discovered in a town shrine, close to a storeroom which was full of grain at the time of the town's destruction, and the excavators argue, convincingly, that the Kouros was a personification of Diktaian Zeus or Orion, set up to watch over the successful harvest.
Public buildings reflect the investment of social resources and are usually interpreted as the embodiments of political, social, religious and economic power. The architecture of such buildings is often especially devised to reflect the... more
Public buildings reflect the investment of social resources and are usually interpreted as the embodiments of political, social, religious and economic power. The architecture of such buildings is often especially devised to reflect the performance of this power, incorporating a symbolism that served as a signpost for a particular social order. This symbolism was especially carried by monumentality and enhanced by scale, location, decoration, materials and visual impact. By making particular use of the natural landscape and the artificially created environment, the monumentality of public buildings helped to improve social cohesion and legitimated a particular societal system. Moreover, their intergenerational use gave such buildings great potential for communication and remembrance, especially during specific ceremonies. This volume is the reflection of an international conference which brought together specialists from two sides of the Eastern Mediterranean, the Near East and the Aegean, two areas that interrelated at different levels and at different moments during the Bronze Age, in order to examine how public architecture was used within this process.
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